by George Taniwaki

It was raining all day, keeping me from doing yard work this afternoon. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it. So I started doodling and came up with an invention to keep exterior concrete steps from getting covered with puddles of water.

My idea is to use a hard rubber mold on top of each tread to cut notches in the step that act as gutters to guide the water down to the next step down.

The drawing below shows the cross-section of a typical concrete step with a 11-inch tread and 7-inch riser. The tread has a series of 1-inch wide triangular grooves molded into it. The grooves are sloped down the tread. The groove is 1/8-inch deep at the start of the tread (cross-section AA) and reaches 1/2-inch deep (to become 45-degrees) at the end of the tread (cross-section BB).

The design has several nice features.

  1. Unlike most concrete steps, the treads are not sloped. The tops of the grooves are level to the ground. This improves safety. You won’t slide, and potentially fall, when the steps are wet, muddy, or icy
  2. The grooves shed water from the treads. This keeps water from forming puddles on the treads even if the concrete for the steps is poured slightly off-level
  3. The grooves reduces the contact area between the step and your shoes, to increase traction, which again improves safety

ConcreteSteps

Concrete steps design. Drawing by George Taniwaki

I’ve never seen concrete steps with grooves like this. So either I am the first person to think of this, or my design is a solution in search of a problem that doesn’t exist.